Cool art, design, photography, from all over. Check out my personal art.

 

classicladiesofcolor:

The Marla Gibbs doll, introduced by Shindana Toys, due to the popularity of her Florence character on The Jeffersons. The toy company was a Los Angeles based company that wanted to create unique toys for African American children.

As a young boy Marla Gibbs had already affected me in ways I couldn’t understand. Good thing I never found the cleavage baring sexy disco doll.

classicladiesofcolor:

The Marla Gibbs doll, introduced by Shindana Toys, due to the popularity of her Florence character on The Jeffersons. The toy company was a Los Angeles based company that wanted to create unique toys for African American children.

As a young boy Marla Gibbs had already affected me in ways I couldn’t understand. Good thing I never found the cleavage baring sexy disco doll.

(Source: blackdollcollecting.blogspot.com)

honey-rider:

LEROY NEIMAN (American, 1921-2012). Miss Vixen, “What’s New, Pussycat?”, circa 1965

honey-rider:

LEROY NEIMAN (American, 1921-2012). Miss Vixen, “What’s New, Pussycat?”, circa 1965

medievalpoc:

Stefano Della Bella
Sumatra
Italy (c. 1625)
Print;  Jeu de la géographie.
Harvard Art Museums

Line work is sublime… masterful.

medievalpoc:

Stefano Della Bella

Sumatra

Italy (c. 1625)

Print; Jeu de la géographie.

Harvard Art Museums

Line work is sublime… masterful.

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!

Charles Cordier

African Venus

France (1851)

Bronze, 39.5 cm.

The Walters Museum:

Cordier submitted a plaster cast of the bust of an African visitor to Paris to the Salon of 1848, and two years later he again entered it as a bronze (Walters 54.2664). A young African woman served as the model for this companion piece in 1851. Regarded as powerful expressions of nobility and dignity, these sculptures proved to be highly popular: casts were acquired by the Museum of National History in Paris and also by Queen Victoria. The Walters’ pair were cast by the Paris foundry Eck and Durand in 1852. These bronzes were esteemed by 19th-century viewers as expressions of human pride and dignity in the face of grave injustice.

[mod note]

One of the things I love most about this piece is that you get something new from almost every single angle.

Photo credits: galeri.uludagsozluk.com, opacity (flickr), The Walters Museum.

[previous submission on this work]

afro-textured-art:

Bust of a black African, Rome, Nicolas Cordier, c.1610
Photo Coutesy to and located at Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden, Skulpturensammlung(Sculpture Collection)

afro-textured-art:

Bust of a black African, Rome, Nicolas Cordier, c.1610

Photo Coutesy to and located at Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden, Skulpturensammlung(Sculpture Collection)

afro-textured-art:

Head of a Jain Tirthankara (10-11th century India)
Courtesy and currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA.

afro-textured-art:

Head of a Jain Tirthankara (10-11th century India)

Courtesy and currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA.

afro-textured-art:

Yoruba head of a queen, from Ita Yemoo, Ife, Nigeria, 12th-13th century (terracotta) 
Photo courtesy to Marcelino Botin Foundation
Located at the Museum for African Art, New York City

afro-textured-art:

Yoruba head of a queen, from Ita Yemoo, Ife, Nigeria, 12th-13th century (terracotta) 

Photo courtesy to Marcelino Botin Foundation

Located at the Museum for African Art, New York City

retrogasm:

Elvira kicks off Spooky Girls Day

Know your brand

retrogasm:

Elvira kicks off Spooky Girls Day

Know your brand